German Shorthaired Pointer

Here at Go Fetch LTD we have a German Shorthaired Pointer, she is nearly 4 years old and was breed in the UK by a specialist breeder.

She was fully trained by a handler and trainer, she then passed all of the relevant training required to work the streets of the UK, We transport bonnie to every work location by road.

She is a loving pet and enjoys to work, she spends her days relaxing in the house!

We have put together some information regarding the breed for you all to enjoy.

Personalities of German Shorthaired Pointers

Even though these types of pointers are hunters, they are also suited for family life. They’re intelligent, friendly and affectionate. However, they are also boisterous and aloof at times. The personality will affect the way that you train them. This breed of dog can be shy towards humans, and there is an element of fear.

The good news is that the characteristics that seem negative actually make the pets extremely easy to train. They love interaction, and will work well with treats so they pick up commands quickly.

Due to the boisterousness it is important to be careful when around children. This breed will not understand that children are hurt more easily compared to adults, and loves to play around. The animals are full of energy, which can be a negative for those that are constrained to the house for long periods of time. Children will find them great when out in the park, as both get to expel their built-up energy levels.

Those that are not trained fully or do not have the chance to expel energy will become destructive in nature. They are hyperactive, and can look for any way to get rid of the energy and this is not always in good, helpful ways.

Getting Along With Other Dogs

For those who have other pets in the house, the German shorthaired pointer is an excellent addition. This breed is extremely friendly with other breeds of dogs. The downside is those who have cats, rabbits and other smaller animals. The breed is a hunting breed, and the scent of other animals can bring out the hunting personality.

It is possible to train the breed away from this instinct. However, this will take some time. It is important to work on this from when the pet is a puppy.

Activities Best for the German Shorthaired Pointer

It is important to develop activities that are perfect for this breed of dog. Remember that this is a hunting dog, so activities that mimic this are great. Running with this breed is a great way to expel the energy, and you will gain the exercise that you need on a daily basis.

Any vigorous activities are worth taking part in. If you love to hunt, it’s worth getting one of these pets to join in with you. Carting and mushing are other great options.

If you’re not a hunting fan, watch out for dead animals being brought to your front door. Pigeons, rats and cats are common options, because it is in their nature to do this. You will need to work on training your pet to make sure he only brings home legitimate prey and keeps the dead animals to a minimum.

Caring for Your Pet Dog

Overall this is one of the healthiest dogs you will be find. However, there are a few hereditary disorders to look out for. These include skin disorders, eye diseases and hip dysplasia. The good news is that most of the disorders can be treated, especially when caught easily. If you have a female dog, you will need to consider getting her spayed due to the risk of breast cancer otherwise.

Fungal infections are among the most likely issues. This is due to the hunting and coming into contact with game that already has the bacteria and fungi. The gums are the most likely for this to happen, so it is important to take good care of your pet’s oral health. You should also check for small cuts and wounds regularly to make sure the infection does not get into them.

Generally speaking, this breed is clean and requires little grooming. The downside is they malt a lot.

The lifespan for a healthy German shorthaired pointer is between nine and 12 years. You will need to do a lot of training, especially as a puppy, and make sure you have the schedule to help him work off all his energy. With a good home, it is possible for the pets to last to around 15 years, with the oldest recorded dog being 17 years old!